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passaxpassa:

Debra Shaw by Kai-Uwe Gundlach

passaxpassa:

Debra Shaw by Kai-Uwe Gundlach

(Source: vl4da, via exposednipple)

danielparisphoto:

Girl Seated in a Chair
By Daniel Paris

danielparisphoto:

Girl Seated in a Chair

By Daniel Paris

(Source: )

biocanvas:

Crystallized sulfur
Known to be behind the characteristic odor of rotting eggs, sulfur is essential for all living cells. Cells make proteins that form strong chemical bonds called disulfide bridges between two adjacent sulfur atoms. These bridges give strength to our hair, outer skin, and nails. Eggs are loaded with sulfur because disulfide bridges are needed to form feathers, which explains why eggs smell on rotting. Because sulfur is easy to smell, natural gas lines—which are normally odorless—have sulfur additives to help people identify and smell a gas leak when it occurs.
Image by Dr. Edward Gafford.

biocanvas:

Crystallized sulfur

Known to be behind the characteristic odor of rotting eggs, sulfur is essential for all living cells. Cells make proteins that form strong chemical bonds called disulfide bridges between two adjacent sulfur atoms. These bridges give strength to our hair, outer skin, and nails. Eggs are loaded with sulfur because disulfide bridges are needed to form feathers, which explains why eggs smell on rotting. Because sulfur is easy to smell, natural gas lines—which are normally odorless—have sulfur additives to help people identify and smell a gas leak when it occurs.

Image by Dr. Edward Gafford.

(Source: microscopyu.com)

passaxpassa:

Debra Shaw by Kai-Uwe Gundlach

passaxpassa:

Debra Shaw by Kai-Uwe Gundlach

(Source: vl4da, via exposednipple)

danielparisphoto:

Girl Seated in a Chair
By Daniel Paris

danielparisphoto:

Girl Seated in a Chair

By Daniel Paris

(Source: )

(Source: kitschyliving, via lyssahumana)

mpdrolet:

From Travellers
Tom Hunter

mpdrolet:

From Travellers

Tom Hunter

(via humansolatium)

(Source: owmyowmy, via oddpervert)

biocanvas:

Crystallized sulfur
Known to be behind the characteristic odor of rotting eggs, sulfur is essential for all living cells. Cells make proteins that form strong chemical bonds called disulfide bridges between two adjacent sulfur atoms. These bridges give strength to our hair, outer skin, and nails. Eggs are loaded with sulfur because disulfide bridges are needed to form feathers, which explains why eggs smell on rotting. Because sulfur is easy to smell, natural gas lines—which are normally odorless—have sulfur additives to help people identify and smell a gas leak when it occurs.
Image by Dr. Edward Gafford.

biocanvas:

Crystallized sulfur

Known to be behind the characteristic odor of rotting eggs, sulfur is essential for all living cells. Cells make proteins that form strong chemical bonds called disulfide bridges between two adjacent sulfur atoms. These bridges give strength to our hair, outer skin, and nails. Eggs are loaded with sulfur because disulfide bridges are needed to form feathers, which explains why eggs smell on rotting. Because sulfur is easy to smell, natural gas lines—which are normally odorless—have sulfur additives to help people identify and smell a gas leak when it occurs.

Image by Dr. Edward Gafford.

(Source: microscopyu.com)

bacchanales-sexuelles:

Sylvia Sorrente.

bacchanales-sexuelles:

Sylvia Sorrente.

(Source: noelquintela, via norbibacsi)

About:

All kind of reference and some personal stuff from time to time.

Following:

PJ
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